Uncle
DNA Testing

The Uncle DNA test is an indirect way of establishing the identity of biological parents. The test will establish whether a male is the uncle of a potential niece or nephew. Generally, you should only use this test when the parents of the potential niece or nephew are not available for testing.

The Uncle DNA Test can establish the following:

  • How can I prove he is my nephew? Or, is she my niece?
  • Is he my brother’s son? Or, is she my brother’s daughter?
  • Is he my dad’s brother? Or, is he my mum’s brother?

How does the Uncle DNA Test work?

The test analyses genetic locations on the DNA strand. First, we create a DNA profile for each test participant. Next, the DNA profiles of the test participants are then compared. As a result, related individuals should have more DNA in common than unrelated individuals. The DNA of related individuals will match at more locations than unrelated people.

This statistical analysis takes into consideration many different factors. These include the number of matches between the DNA profiles of each person. Also, how popular DNA markers are within a given population and ethnic group.

We use the values from the calculations to generate a percentage probability. In turn, this will show which relationship is most likely to exist between the individuals.

 

How accurate is the Uncle DNA Test?

The Uncle DNA Test can provide accurate results. But this is not a direct relationship test such as maternity or paternity testing. As a result, there is small a chance that the test could yield an inconclusive result. In the case of this test, the risk of an inconclusive result is 1% (1 in 100).

If one known parent of the child is available for testing, then we will include them in the test for free. In this case, this could increase the accuracy of the test.

 

Is this DNA Test the right one for you?

This test can be between a potential uncle and nephew, and a potential uncle and niece – or both.

Depending on the situation known, we can determine an aunt or unrelated relationship. This test is undertaken when a person believes their sibling is the mother or father of an individual. A popular test is when a male believes his brother is the father of a child, but the potential father cannot be tested.

A Clinical Advisor will work with you to establish exactly what the situation is. This will include what the known facts are. As a result, we can determine the correct form of test for your family.

Uncle DNA Tests are usually an indirect way of testing the identity of a biological parent. This is without including that alleged parent in the test.

They can be very accurate and useful DNA tests. But they cannot replace the tests that directly test the DNA of a biological parent. For example, if an alleged father is available for testing, you should use a Paternity DNA Test.

If potential siblings exist, consider a Sibling DNA Test. Also, there is the Grandparent DNA Test to consider. It is important that you discuss the situation with our team of Clinical Advisors.

 

How do I order this test?

There are many options available to you, these include:

  • Call 0800 988 7107 to order an Uncle DNA Test Home Kit*
  • Make an appointment at one of our DNA Clinics by calling 0800 988 7107
  • Or, arrange for a sample collection technician to visit your location by calling 0800 988 7107
  • Also, you or your solicitor can contact us to organise a Legal DNA Test for court purposes

* Please note, you can only use self-collection kits for peace of mind purposes only.

 

Why choose DNA Clinics?

  • DNA Clinics is a brand partner of Boots
  • Processing of all Uncle DNA tests is in a UK laboratory with UKAS accreditation
  • A standard turnaround of only 5 days for Uncle DNA Test results
  • Established in 2005, our team of experts will guide you through the science
  • Unrivalled convenience with a choice of over 50 DNA Clinics nationwide
  • Certification to 3 ISO standards. This includes Quality, Information Security and Environment standards
  • We are a registered company with the Information Commissioners Office